Mar 1, 2014

Hannah Arendt Center- THE IRONY OF THE ELITE




Date: Sun, 23 Feb 2014 09:32:15 -0500
From: arendt@bard.edu
To: bigredjbird@hotmail.com
Subject: Hannah Arendt Center- Amor Mundi 2/23/14

  
 Amor Mundi, 2/23/14
AMOR MUNDI

 

Hannah Arendt considered calling her magnum opus Amor Mundi: Love of the World. Instead, she settled upon The Human Condition. What is most difficult, Arendt writes, is to love the world as it is, with all the evil and suffering in it. And yet she came to do just that. Loving the world means neither uncritical acceptance nor contemptuous rejection. Above all it means the unwavering facing up to and comprehension of that which is.

 

 

Every Sunday, The Hannah Arendt Center Amor Mundi Weekly Newsletter will offer our favorite essays and blog posts from around the web. These essays will help you comprehend the world. And learn to love it.

                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the London Review of Books' winter lecture, classicist Mary Beard discusses how the silencing of women was a common dramatic trope throughout Greek and Roman antiquity. From Telemachus' admonition to Penelope in the Odyssey ("take up your own work, the loom and the distaff...speech will be the business of men") to the silencing of the princess Philomela by cutting out her tongue in Ovid's Metamorphoses, female oratory was treated as inappropriate or even dangerous in the public sphere. In the classical tradition, "public speaking and oratory were not merely things that ancient women didn't do: they were exclusive practices and skills that defined masculinity as a gender. As we saw with Telemachus, to become a man - and we're talking elite man - was to claim the right to speak. Public speech was a - if not the - defining attribute of male-ness." The derision of female speech, argues Beard, was not only embedded in our modern traditions of speechmaking but remains an alarmingly widespread issue today, as women speaking in public face a far greater quantity of death threats, Internet trolling, and verbal abuse than men. "The more I have looked at the threats and insults that women have received, the more I have found that they fit into the old patterns I've been talking about," writes Beard. "For a start it doesn't much matter what line you take as a woman, if you venture into traditional male territory, the abuse comes anyway. It's not what you say that prompts it, it's the fact you're saying it." 

 

 

             
  
 

 

 

 

 

 

Peggy Noonan is worried about the decadence of elite American culture in response to a video compilation of real congressmen quoting their favorite lines from the Netflix series "House of Cards," and the recent publication of an excerpt from Kevin Roose's new book Young Money. While the folks over at DailyKos are foaming about the irony of Ronald Reagan's speechwriter complaining about the excesses of the power elites, Noonan makes an important point about the corrosive effects that irony has on elites and on culture more generally. ""House of Cards" very famously does nothing to enhance Washington's reputation. It reinforces the idea that the capital has no room for clean people. The earnest, the diligent, the idealistic, they have no place there. Why would powerful members of Congress align themselves with this message? Why do they become part of it? I guess they think they're showing they're in on the joke and hip to the culture. I guess they think they're impressing people with their surprising groovelocity.... All of this is supposed to be merry, high-jinksy, unpretentious, wickedly self-spoofing. But it seems more self-exposing, doesn't it? And all of it feels so decadent." Read more about the decadence and irony of elites on the blog in Roger Berkowitz's Weekend Read

 

                            

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a review of Mario Livio's new book Brilliant Blunders, Freeman Dyson praises the theory, particularly the incorrect theory, as the engine of science: "They are free creations of the human mind, intended to describe our understanding of nature. Since our understanding is incomplete, theories are provisional. Theories are tools of understanding, and a tool does not need to be precisely true in order to be useful. Theories are supposed to be more-or-less true, with plenty of room for disagreement. A scientist who invents a theory that turns out to be wrong is judged leniently. Mistakes are tolerated, so long as the culprit is willing to correct them when nature proves them wrong."

 

                        

  

  

 

 

 

Ray Kurzweil reviews Spike Jonze's Her, which features a romance between a man and his computer's sentient operating system, and takes issue with the ending: "In my view, biological humans will not be outpaced by the AIs because they (we) will enhance themselves (ourselves) with AI. It will not be us versus the machines (whether the machines are enemies or lovers), but rather, we will enhance our own capacity by merging with our intelligent creations. We are doing this already. Even though most of our computers - although not all - are not yet physically inside us, I consider that to be an arbitrary distinction."

 

                            

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a review of Claude Lannzman's long percolating The Last of the Unjust, about Benjamin Murmelstein, the last surviving Jewish elder of the Nazi's show ghetto at Theresienstadt, Leah Falk wonders whether reportage or art will ultimately prove more effective at preserving the terror of the Holocaust: "Is there a kind of truth that can't be adequately served by even the toughest oral testimony, but only by art? The film's investigation is not: Was Murmelstein a collaborator? But rather, did Lanzmann's interview with Murmelstein tell his story? Or were we too late? Has everyone, with regard to the Holocaust, always been too late? About Shoah, Lanzmann admitted that he had made a film about the kinds of stories the human brain was not made to handle. Our handling of them as they grow more distant, as the emotional current underneath the facts becomes even less immediately accessible, is something fragile, a skill that must be not only taught, but also constantly reinvented."

 

 



Blogging and the New Public Intellectual - A Discussion with Tom Goldstein
Sunday, March 9, 2014 , 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Bard Graduate Center, NYC

Learn more here

R.S.V.P. to arendt@bard.edu


 

This week on the blog, Jennifer Hudson considers Arendt's understanding of knowledge as tyrannical, and Roger Berkowitz asks two journalists what they understand as their role. And Berkowitz also turns to Nietzsche and Arendt in the Weekend Read to make sense of our elite culture of decadence and irony.   

 

Until next time,
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